Podcast

#34: Inna Kuznetsova President & COO INTTRA

#34: Inna Kuznetsova President & COO INTTRA

Inna Kuznetsova President & COO INTTRA

Inna Kuznetsova is President and Chief Operating Officer of INTTRA, leading sales, service delivery, marketing, strategic alliances, product management, IT infrastructure and software development.
Before joining INTTRA in early 2015 Inna was the Chief Commercial Officer at CEVA Logistics and prior to that spent 19 years at IBM, where in her last role she was the Vice-President, Marketing & Sales Enablement for IBM Systems Software.
In addition to executive roles, she has experience of serving on both private and public company boards, including chairing remuneration (compensation) and nominations committees as well as serving on audit & risk committees.
Inna holds PhD. in Mathematics from Moscow State University, Russia, and MBA from Columbia Business School.
Inna has also written two books on career growth:  «Up! A practical approach to career growth» and «A month in the sky. Practical notes on the ways of professional growth» 

Some of the highlights from the podcast:

  • Regional P&Ls politics versus the allocating resources for IT development  
  • Lack of standardization is directly linked with lack of visibility – issues that have a heavy impact on the cargo owners 
  • Blockchain – what is the potential in building a network? – not a solution to all pains – where it works and where it doesn’t 
  • Importance of having a firewall between the carriers and the clients in a blockchain environment 
  • 3 areas we are looking for when hiring:  professional skill, understanding of IT, understanding of the industry  
  • Importance of pairing people with complementary skills 
  • Shortage of truck drivers – not the most popular job with the young generation
  • Always be open to learn no matter how experienced or senior you are 
  • How to have a great career with a thick accent 
  • Inna shares how she manages her fear of small talk and the importance of networking the right way

Episode #34: Inna Kuznetsova President & COO INTTRA

Show notes:

  • [01:40] Where do you see the industry at the moment? What do you think of the impact of digitization trend? 
  • [07:30] Are there organisations that have an efficient process for allocating resources to their IT department? 
  • [12:40] What can you tell us about standardization? 91% of respondents in INTTRA Tech Summit survey called data sharing standards an “absolute necessity” or “very important”.
  • [17:50] Is there any example of blockchain implementation that shows most promise?
  • [25:40] Talking about the importance of having an independent and neutral body bringing together the players who will use blockchain.  
  • [29:30] What are the most important skills in Supply Chain that companies are looking for? What type of mindset are companies looking for?
  • [35:55] Talking about bringing a gaming executive from the gaming industry to the shipping industry – cross pollination of skills. 
  • [38:44] I know you have 2 published books around career development and you also are very active in social media. «Up! A practical approach to career growth» and «A month in the sky. Practical notes on the ways of professional growth» – what are the main topics that you cover and what motivated you to write them?
  • [48:55] What advice would give to a young graduate in finding their career path? 

Listen to all our past episodes:

#33: IBM and BlockChain

IBM-Blockchain-Podcast

IBM and BlockChain

Today I am happy to have with us Meeta Vouk, director of IBM Singapore Research Center and previously Chief Data officer Blockchain technologies.
And the topic of our discussion will be Blockchain and specifically we will discuss some of the practical case studies it is already used by clients across the region and the globe.

Some of the highlights from the podcast:

  • Microloans based on peer identity in areas where people have  no official papers
  • How the blockchain story is different from the RFID story for logistics
  • In 5 years we will not use the word “blockchain” anymore
  • For any long supply chain with a big number of middlemen, blockchain can be a huge disruptor
  • Smart-contracts and enforcing the rule of – not to spending money you don’t have.
  • Teach kids art and philosophy and then show them technology as a tool to solve the problems we really need to focus on.

Episode #33: IBM and BlockChain

Show notes:

  • [00:50] What exactly is blockchain?
  • [03:08] What are the biggest truths and myths about blockchain?
  • [05:26] Millions of people suffer because they don’t have an official paper for their identity. How would blockchain solve that?
  • [09:16] RFID was very hyped a few years ago and din’t really deliver on the promise. What is the difference between RFID and blockchain now?
  • [12:16] Let’s go into some examples. Can you go case studies of projects in blockchain with your clients?
  • [15:50] How can a contaminated source of spinach be tracked down with blockchain in a matter of seconds compared the current reality where we have to throw the whole batch away to be safe?
  • [19:30] There is quite a lot of work when implementing a solution like blockchain – even the labeling of fresh produce – how do you solve this?
  • [24:08] Do you have some data from your clients that can showcase savings or efficiency increase in their operations after implementing blockchain?
  • [30:48] Where do you see the biggest adoption of blockchain in the next years?
  • [32:25] In Supply Chain – where do you see blockchain creating the biggest impact?
  • [34:15] How does one become a blockchain expert? What do you need to study?

Listen to all our past episodes:

#32: Laura Behrens Wu Founder & CEO at Shippo

Laura Behrens Wu Founder & CEO at Shippo

Laura Behrens Wu Founder & CEO at Shippo

It is my pleasure to have us with us today Laura Behrens Wu, CEO of Shippo. Shippo is the best multi-carrier shipping software which empowers retailers, e-commerce platforms, marketplaces, logistics providers with the building blocks they need to succeed with shipping. They basically offer Amazon-level shipping for all their clients. Processing millions of shipments each month for 35000 customers, they have grown to a team of close to 100 staff and have raised around 29 million so far from various investors.

Laura Behrens Wu is the founder and CEO of Shippo. Laura, 26 years old, and Simon Kreuz, 28 years old, they started Shippo in 2013. Laura had her first experience with a startup while working as an intern at a start up company LendUp, which was a Y Combinator alumni start up (as the combinator that invested in Dropbox, Airbnb, and many other top start ups). She grew up in Germany, China, Ecuador, and Cairo, went to school in Switzerland and started Shippo in the U.S.

Some of the highlights from the podcast:

  • How  they work with some of their partners: Shopify and  Facebook Marketplace
  • Why building the best tech experience for their clients is their focus?
  • How are they helping FedEx and UPS – the traditional players –  to reach more clients
  • Amazon and Alibaba – how do you compete with this guys?
  • Amazon is driving the shipping standard – so our clients come to us for help to compete
  • Why they focus on customization and authenticity?
  • Tell a compelling story

Episode #32: Laura Behrens Wu Founder & CEO at Shippo

Show notes:

  • [01:43] How was it to grow up in so many places and also how is it to be a founder at such an young age?
  • [03:19] How old were you when you started Shippo?
  • [08:20] Can you tell us a bit more about some of your clients? I know you have some great case studies with some clients – would be great to hear more about their results after they started working with you clients: VNYL, Bean Box, MeUndies.
  • [11:40] How did you manage to convince the traditional players – UPS, FedEx, DHL – to come on your platform?
  • [14:10] Shippo has a very big potential competitor in the form of Amazon.com or Alibaba – how do you compete with this guys?
  • [18:01] What is your customer acquisition strategy – who is your target?
  • [19:40] What are some of the most important e-commerce trends you see at the moment?  I was reading on your blog: 68 percent of sellers consider the cost of shipping to be their biggest operational challenge. Plus, shipping has become a key consideration in the consumer purchasing process. 31 percent of consumers will wait to make a purchase until there’s a free shipping offer.
  • [21:18] The solution we’re offering is especially valuable for Europe and the US. In the rest of the world, however, finding the right courier service for international shipment is a big hassle. How do you fix this challenge – where would you expand next?
  • [26:34] What are some of the key attributes you look for in the leadership team?
  • [30:57] What is the most challenging part about finding and attracting the right talent?
  • [34:42] You are one of the few females founders in a male-dominated industry. How has this affected your journey so far? I imagine there are some challenges to talk about around this.
  • [36:51] What were some of the lessons you learned so far as an entrepreneur? Key takeaways.
  • [39:55] Looking back at the Shippo story so far, what are the things that make you most proud of?

Listen to all our past episodes:

#31: Zvi Schreiber CEO at Freightos

Zvi Schreiber CEO at Freightos

Zvi Schreiber CEO at Freightos

Today I am happy to have with us Zvi Schreiber CEO at Freightos.  Freightos is an online freight marketplace and SaaS software to usher the logistics industry into the digital era, making global shipping faster, more cost-effective and smoother. Simply put, like Expedia or Kayak for the shipping industry. With Investors including GE Ventures and the Singapore Exchange they raised $94.4 million. And currently have around 200 employees and six offices across the United States, Asia and the Middle East.

Zvi Schreiber  is a serial Internet entrepreneur. He founded Tradeum Inc. one of the pioneers of B2B E-Commerce, which achieved revenues of over US$100m. Later on founded Unicorn Inc., sold to IBM, and G.ho.st, sold to Infinity Fund. He also was CEO of clean-tech electronics company Lightech which he sold in 2011 to General Electric (GE) Lighting. He has a PhD in Computer Science and he’s also the author of Fizz: Nothing Is as It Seems, which tells the history of physics as a novel.

Some of the highlights from the podcast:

  • Automated pricing at a few clicks away – for freight? Does this really work?
  • Transparency is inevitable – how do you work with this?
  • Why selling online is better? You don’t need an army of people in nice suits playing golf with your client.
  • Why Zvi works in an open space not an office?
  • What do to as an entrepreneur when you know most startups fail?
  • 50% of all importers still use excel sheets – how does Freightos tackle that?

Episode #31: Zvi Schreiber CEO at Freightos

Show notes:

  • [01:31] What threw you in the entrepreneurship bug? Does it run in the family?
  • [03:02] How did you decide to found Freightos? How did you end up in the freight industry?
  • [05:16] Considering that nearly 50% of all importers (47% to be exact) still use spreadsheets. How does Freightos address this issue?
  • [09:10] There have been a few hurdles to get over. Forwarders have naturally been nervous about a potential downward pressure on rates that could come from an online booking service. How did you overcome this hurdles?
  • [11:51] You said somewhere that the launch of other online platforms, such as Kuehne + Nagel’s – FreightNet – has also helped the industry move on. How do you see this movement?
  • [14:04] Who is your main target customer and do you work with them? What are some examples you  can give us?
  • [17:14] How does Freightos ensure that all liners hosted on their website are just not competing on the price point but also giving the desires level of service to its customer?
  • [19:07] The Singapore Exchange (SGX) has completed a US$44.4 million, Series C funding round for Freightos. Can you tell us more about how you plan to develop synchronicites between SGX and Freightos?
  • [22:01] What are the biggest challenges that company has when working in Europe and Asia? what are the differences in terms of standards and operations?
  • [24:16] Where do you plan to expand next? Any focus areas you have in mind?
  • [26:55] What do you focus on when hiring people at Freightos?
  • [29:01] What are some of the elements that define the culture of Freightos?
  • [30:34] How do you manage to attract the top talent – why do people choose your company and not others?
  • [32:42] What were some of the lessons you learned so far as an entrepreneur? Key takeaways.
  • [34:19] Looking back at the Freightos story so far, what are the things that make you most proud of?
  • [36:18] Tell us a bit more about the book – Fizz: Nothing Is as It Seems. 

Listen to all our past episodes:

#30: Keith Carter Associate Professor | Author | TEDx Speaker

Keith Carter Associate Professor, NUS School of ComputingKeith Carter Associate Professor at the NUS School of Computing

Keith is an associate professor at the NUS School of Computing, where he has two mandates: teaching and consulting. He has a passion for engaging and inspiring students to achieve more. He teaches Supply Chain Visualization, and Purchasing and Materials Management and connects students with companies at all levels to bring the theory to life in the business world.

His book, Actionable Intelligence: A Guide to Delivering Business Results with Big Data Fast!, provides expert guidance to establish a culture of fact-based decision making and appropriate high-speed governance.

From 1999 to 2012 Keith worked for the Estee Lauder Companies, Global Supply Chain Center of Excellence, tasked to lead the strategic changes to supply chain to improve the overall performance of the company. Keith established and led Global Supply Chain initiatives: Supply Chain Intelligence, Knowledge Management, Transformation Governance, and Data Management. All to achieve end-to-end supply chain visibility.

As part of his service mandate with School of Computing, he consults companies on Innovation, Customer Centricity, and Actionable Intelligence. Selected examples are Retail & Supply Chain: GUCCI, P&G, Bollore, Panasonic & SAP and Financial Services: KPMG, Goldman Sachs, DBS and China Construction Bank.

He is invited to speak around the world including prestigious venues TEDx, Gartner, IBM, KPMG, SingHealth, Media & Infocomm Development Authority, Financial Times, The Economist and more.

Outside of work he is an avid sportsman, author, private pilot, fencer, and family man. Born in Long Island, he has spent most of his life in New York till moving to Singapore in 2012 where he currently resides.

Some of the highlights from the podcast:

  • Why the hype with AI is connected with the “Emperor’s New Clothes” story?
  • Responding Instantly to a Customer’s request should be top priority for any executive in Supply Chain
  • Mistakes made by Supply Chain executives implementing digitization strategies? – You change the hardware but not the software
  • Importance of Post Governance for Intelligence (Data) – don’t waste time in bureaucracy – show the measurable deliverables
  • Don’t hire data scientists from outside – build them from the inside – they need to understand the company inside-out
  • Talking Blockchain: There’s hardly a Judge in the World that will look at a Smart Contract!
  • The best skill for anyone to have at this moment is: The ability to Google things!

Episode #30: Keith Carter Associate Professor | Author | TEDx Speaker

Show notes:

  • [01:45] What attracted you to Asia? New York seemed to have treated you well. Why choose to leave the US behind and head for Singapore?
  • [03:43] How did your consulting experience help you choose this path to become an expert in supply chain, procurement, big data and machine learning? I know you used to consult big banking clients in the past – Goldman Sachs and Solomon Brothers.
  • [05:24] What where the main challenges and learning points from your experience with Estee Lauder? You served a few supply chain related roles and your last role was Global Supply Chain Intelligence Lead. Almost 13 years of your professional life dedicated to this company. Any key lessons you can share with our audience?
  • [13:32] Let’s talk about your book for a moment -“Actionable Intelligence: A Guide to Delivering Business Results With Big Data Fast.” – How does this term – “Actionable Intelligence” come to life?
  • [17:05] What are some of biggest mistakes executives make when implementing big data and AI in their supply chain?
  • [19:50] Is AI used as buzz word too much? Can you share what is your opinion on the hype with AI?
  • [26:20] If a Chief Supply Chain needs  to implement next year to improve their operations – what should it be? AI, machine learning, big data, blockchain?
  • [30:59] Let’s go into some examples of where strategy and technology meet and create a greater impact on the customer delight process. Maybe you can share some case studies.
  • [37:43] What are the mistakes that you see executives in Supply Chain making when implementing digitization strategies?
  • [46:29] What should executives focus on when hiring in Supply Chain? What are some of the key skills you see as critical for any company’s success?
  • [55:37] What are some of the skills you are teaching your students to take on to be best prepared for the future?

Mentioned in the podcast:

  • x.ai – Our AI software eases the pain of scheduling across your entire company

Listen to all our past episodes:

#29: Razat Gaurav CEO of LLamasoft

Razat Gaurav, CEO of Llamasoft

Razat Gaurav CEO of LLamasoft

Today I am excited to have with us Razat Gaurav, CEO of LLamasoft. LLamasoft is a supply chain design software which helps organizations worldwide across a wide range of industries to model, optimize and simulate their supply chain network, leading to major improvements in cost, service, sustainability and risk mitigation. 50% of Fortune 100 companies have designed their supply chains with LLamasoft.

A few words on Razat Gaurav:
Razat has more than two decades of supply chain planning and execution experience, he has played a critical role in the digital transformations of some of the world’s biggest brands and his work has influenced the flow of billions of dollars’ worth of goods. With proven leadership in scaling and growing enterprise software businesses on a global basis, Razat most recently served as JDA Software’s Executive Vice President, General Manager and Chief Revenue Officer and previously held leadership roles at i2 Technologies and Ernst & Young (EY). A trusted expert on supply chain trends, he has been quoted in The New York Times, Forbes and The Hill, among other top media. Razat has a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology.

Some of the highlights from the podcast:

  • How they helped Schneider Electric to save 8 mil USD in cost
  • How to optimize a fresh produce supply chain – like avocados and bananas
  • Outsmarting uncertainty – Challenges that most clients face before implementing LLamasoft software
  • Creating a platform for clients to develop their own Supply Chain APP

Episode #29: Razat Gaurav CEO of LLamasoft

Show notes:

  • [01:32] For the few of our listeners that maybe are not yet familiar with LLamaSoft, What is a simple way to explain what LLamaSoft is?
  • [02:26] Can you give us some case studies of how LLamasoft has helped some of your clients achieve great improvements in their supply chains? I think it was a Schneider Electric study case where you saved 8 mil USD in cost.
  • [07:40] Talking about fresh produce like avocados and bananas – how did LLamasoft play a role in optimizing the supply chain for clients that deal with this kind of goods.
  • [13:20] What are the challenges that most of your clients face before implementing LLamasoft software?
  • [21:10] How do you differentiate yourself from your competition? What are the key elements you focus on?
  • [32:38] I understand that you doubled your headcount in the last three years, now reaching around 500. How do you make sure that the recruitment process is on point – effective? What are the things you look for when hiring?
  • [37:55] What are some of the key attributes you look for in the leadership team?
  • [41:00] What are your expansion plans?  Where do you plan to expand next and what are the next milestones?
  • [45:42] If you were to think about the industry in next 5-10 years. What are some of the trends you see coming?

Listen to all our past episodes:

#28: Brad Hollister CEO of SwanLeap

Brad Hollister, CEO of SwanLeap

Brad Hollister CEO of SwanLeap

I am excited to have with us today Brad Hollister, CEO of SwanLeap.
SwanLeap is the No. 1 company on the 2018 Inc. 5000 fastest growing private companies in US. Its revenue has jumped from $110,000 in 2013 to $100 million in 2017. This year they are likely to break the $500 million mark – Which makes it among the fastest growing start ups in the world!
Through their rapidly deployed, custom implementation of NextGen TMS (transportation managemente system) and auditing services, SwanLeap is using AI and machine learning to automate many of the manual roles in a company’s supply chain. And in this way providing supply chain managers, decision-makers and entire companies with comprehensive, actionable insights into supply chain logistics and costs by generating significant savings. Headquartered in Madison, Wisconsin, SwanLeap brings unprecedented clarity and control to a fragmented shipping market through a proprietary machine learning platform that curates cost-effective and personalized supply chain recommendations in real time across all transportation modes to improve connections between sender, receiver and carrier.

A few words about Brad, he is the Chief Executive Officer of SwanLeap and under his leadership, SwanLeap delivered an unprecedented 75,660.8% growth in revenue in the past three years.
A life-long entrepreneur passionate about improving the world, Brad is the visionary behind SwanLeap’s next generation technology. With extensive experience in transportation, logistics and supply chain, his leadership and institutional expertise solidify SwanLeap’s position as the leading provider of end-to-end transportation technology. Brad is a guest lecturer for the Wisconsin School of Business at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, as well as a sought-after speaker on the advancement and disruption of the transportation industry. He is also a proud alumnus of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse.

Some of the highlights from the podcast:

  • How did they achieve a 75,660% growth in the past 3 years?
  • Why do executives need to be involved from beginning to end in the process of improving visibility and cost optimization?
  • Talking about complacency and fear – Why some industry practitioners  don’t like the idea of saving 20 to 40% on cost with a solution like SwanLeap?
  • How do you protect data confidentiality all the way through for your clients?

Episode #28: Brad Hollister CEO of SwanLeap

Show notes:

  • [02:34] But before we talk about SwanLeap, let’s talk a bit about the start up you had before that. You sunk 200k USD of your own money, landed a big client – but then you decided to shift gears and start SwanLeap. Tell us more about that story.
  • [06:22] How was Swanleap started, what is its story and where is it today? As we know you were working on another start up (Freight Access) and you invested your retirement fund.
  • [11:44] The use of this new technology is allowing SwanLeap to deliver an annual average transportation savings of 26.7% to its customers. Tell us more about how this works – it seems with this kind  of numbers you don’t need sales people.
  • [18:43] What are actually the main stumbling blocks why this type of TMS is not implemented yet worldwide? Why aren’t there more companies that implement this kind of approach to cost saving?
  • [21:30] Talking about AI and data. Do your clients have the data you need to plug it in your systems and help them?
  • [24:00] Who are your main targeted customers? Are there certain criteria you use for your customers or stakeholders?
  • [31:15] How do you stand out of the competition? What makes SwanLeap unique?
  • [36:03] SwanLeap has shown an unprecedented 75,660.8% revenue growth over the past three years. What were the main attributes that contributed to this astonishing growth?
  • [42:41] How do you plan to sustain this pace of growth? Do you have plans to expand to Asia or Europe?
  • [44:40] How do you protect data confidentiality all the way through? You said somewhere: “We follow a set of core rules: We represent our capabilities honestly. We protect confidentiality of client information. We do not misrepresent our purposes in seeking information. We only make promises we can keep. We consider our actions carefully, asking whether we can defend them openly today and in the future.”
  • [48:29] What are some of the key attributes you look for in the leadership team?
  • [51:41] I know you are growing at an astonishing rate. How does your team cope with this pace of growth?
  • [56:35] Looking back at the Swanleap story so far, what are the things that make you most proud of?

Listen to all our past episodes:

#27: Dhruvil Sanghvi CEO of LOGINEXT

Dhruvil Sanghvi, CEO of LOGINEXT

Dhruvil Sanghvi CEO of LOGINEXT

Today I am happy to have Dhruvil Sanghvi, CEO of LOGINEXT – a Leader in the Logistics & Field Service Optimization Software. LogiNext is one of the fastest growing SaaS company in the field workforce and logistics optimization. In under 4 years they have extended their global market with presence in 10 countries and offer field workforce optimization, real-time tracking, route optimization, resource allocation automation, long-haul tracking, and on-demand management to more than 250 enterprise clients, including: FMCG players like P&G, Unilever, Coca Cola, 3PLs like Agility or Yusen, Ecommerce players like Grab or PayTM, chemicals and manufacturing companies like, BASF, TATA, Lanxess, and Dow Chemicals. One of their key investors, Paytm is India’s largest mobile commerce platform, and is backed by Alibaba and Warren Buffett.
Loginext has been awarded by Financial Times 29th Fastest Growing Tech Company in 2018, is on INC 5000 fastest growing logistics companies in US as well as the Best Logistics Tech Player By Frost & Sullivan 2016.

Also short intro about Dhruvil: CEO and co-founder of LogiNext, he is the youngest tech business head in Forbes India 30 under 30 (2017). He started his journey post Carnegie Mellon University working as as a consultant to many Fortune 500 companies such as Ernst & Young and Deloitte. And afterwhich in 2014 he founded LogiNext. To this day he still extends his expertise as a consultant to many incubated startups as well as being an early stage investor

Some of the highlights from the podcast:

  • How LogiNext could become the Google of supply-chain
  • How they use their 16+ algorithms to help their clients optimize their operations
  • How do they measure how much money, time and energy they save for their clients
  • Achieving 95% accuracy of delay, route and time prediction in India
  • Working with their biggest investor and also biggest client – PayTm

Episode #27: Dhruvil Sanghvi CEO of LOGINEXT

Show notes:

  • [02:23] What exactly is LogiNext?
  • [03:45] How was LogiNext started, what is its story and where is it today?
  • [07:28] LogiNext could become the Google of supply-chain as its software helps manage and organise information about anything and everything that moves. What are the benefits of using an easy-to-use online platform like Loginext?
  • [12:15] Can you tell us a bit more about the workings of your algorithms and maybe give us some case studies of how they work?
  • [15:30] Do you have some data or estimates of what you’ve been able to achieve so far in cost, energy, time optimization?
  • [20:10] LogiNext is currently the only real-time logistics analytics company in India with more than 95% accuracy of delay, route and time prediction. What does it take to achieve this accuracy rate and how do you make sure you can maintain and improve it?
  • [24:29] There is an interesting unique story with Paytm as they are both one of the biggest investors and one of the biggest clients. What are the highlights on this dual relation?
  • [29:20] LogiNext’s Delivery Management Platform now comes fully integrated with WhatsApp to enable real-time communication between drivers, dispatch managers and end consumers. Tell us more about that.
  • [32:30] How do you leverage machine learning and big data to push your product further?
  • [34:50] Where do you plan to expand next and what are the plans for the future?
  • [38:10] What do you focus on when hiring people at Loginext?
  • [40:15] You were saying you hired hundreds of people in your start up journey so far – any key lessons to share on how to tell good from the best?
  • [44:15] LogiNext is one of the few tech startup with has close to 50:50 male–female ratio. 30 being the average age. How does this impact the culture inside the organisation?
  • [45:52] What were some of the lessons you learned so far as an entrepreneur? Key takeaways.
  • [47:15] Looking back at the Loginextl story so far, what are the things that make you most proud of?

Listen to all our past episodes:

#26: Troels Randbøll Støvring CEO of Twill Logistics

 

Troels Randbøll Støvring CEO of Twill Logistics

Troels Randbøll Støvring CEO of Twill

Today i am delighted to have with us Troels Randbøll Støvring, CEO of TWILL Logistics.

Born out of a desire to simplify shipping for small and medium enterprises, Twill is a multi-carrier digital freight forwarder that enables you to book, manage and monitor your shipments at the click of a button – from quotation and documentation right through to delivery. They take the complexity of getting your cargo from point A to point B and make it seamless. Now present in 19 countries, Twill is rapidly expanding worldwide.

Troels has been with the Maersk group since 2012, first part of Maersk Tankers, then Damco and now Twill. He took the position of starting a start-up within a corporate. The idea was generated in a strategic assessment done 4 months earlier by Damco. First task was to get a small team which relocated to Berlin …and I will let Troels tell you the rest of the story…

Some of the highlights from the podcast:

  • What is the Twill experience?
  • Changing its brand affiliation from ‘Damco’ to ‘Maersk’ – why is it important?
  • How does Twill use Agile to build fast?
  • What makes Troels proud about building Twill?

Episode #26: Troels Randbøll Støvring CEO of Twill Logistics

Show notes:

  • [01:10] How was Twill started, what is its story and where is it today?
  • [04:00] Why did you go to Berlin to set up the team there in the first place?
  • [06:48] We want to offer our customers ‘the Twill experience’. How do you define the Twill Experience?
  • [08:24] What does Co-creating with customers mean?
  • [10:31] What are the benefits of using an easy-to-use online platform like Twill?
  • [13:50] Will Twill emerge to be the sole customer interface for Damco and Maersk, eliminating and replacing traditional customer front ends and communication channels, customer service teams etc.?
  • [16:01] Twill announced a change in its brand affiliation from ‘Damco’ to ‘Maersk’. With the announcements of Damco / Twill / Maersk Line recently. How will Twill work to position themselves in the market to create the competitive advantage?
  • [18:35] Many companies will try to use artificial intelligence to predict customer demand and optimize routes. Damco/Maersk will have access to more data than a startup, and thus must exploit this competitive advantage to get to market faster. How much does this data help Twill make the best decisions for your clients?
  • [23:33] How is Twill handling risk management in terms of which customers it accepts? Is this also formulated via an algorithm – if so what type of variables are being considered?
  • [26:15] Twill is now present in 19 countries around the world. What are the next target markets? What is your target for the next 12 months?
  • [27:45] What are some of the most important clients that your work with and what do they appreciate most about your service? One hypothesis that didn’t prove right is that we were expecting tech-savvy customers to be the first ones to adopt Twill. In reality, while a basic level of proficiency is needed, if you can buy anything online, you can book your shipping with us – there is no need to be tech savvy to use Twill. Our customers cover a wide spectrum of age, experience and interests.
  • [33:10] Twill’s startup culture is “move fast, break things” and you are very focused on being Agile. How did the agile culture impact the company and how does it help you deliver on your promise?
  • [37:47] How do you use Agile in HR?
  • [39:31] What were some of the lessons you learned so far as an intrapreneur? Key takeaways?
  • [42:08] What are some of the key attributes you look for in the leadership team?
  • [43:53] How do you determine ‘attitude’ and ‘passion’ during the interviews?
  • [46:29] Looking back at the Twill story so far, what are the things that make you most proud of?

Listen to all our past episodes:

#25: TradeLens – a blockchain project by IBM and Maersk

TradeLens - a blockchain project by IBM and Maersk

Vijay Anand, VP Travel, Transportation & Hospitality – Asia Pacific, G.China, Japan and Todd Scott, VP of Blockchain Global Trade at IBM

Today I am happy to have with us Vijay Anand, Worldwide Sales & Distribution, VP Travel, Transportation & Hospitality – Asia Pacific, G.China, Japan and Todd Scott, VP of Blockchain Global Trade at IBM.

And the topic of our discussion will be TradeLens, the joint project between A.P. Moller –Maersk and IBM which applies blockchain to the world’s global supply chain. TradeLens is a blockchain-enabled shipping solution designed to promote more efficient and secure global trade, bringing together various parties to support information sharing and transparency.

94 organizations are actively involved or have agreed to participate on the TradeLens platform built on open standards:

Some of the highlights from the podcast:

  • What is blockchain and how TradeLens is using it to tackle the biggest challenges in the industry
  • Solving the lack of standards, missing regulations in different countries.
  • Security challenges of the system.
  • How do they see the alliance moving forward given a number of shipping lines comments that they won’t join because of Maersk?

Episode #25: TradeLens – a blockchain project by IBM and Maersk

Show notes:

  • [02:16] Before we deep dive into TradeLens, let’s just take a moment to briefly and simply explain to our audience what is blockchain?
  • [03:54] Tell us a bit what are the biggest problems that this tool will solve?
  • [05:40] Are there some practical case studies you can share with us on solving the lack of standards, missing regulations, no acceptance of Bill of Landing in China and India?
  • [07:55] In 2014, Maersk followed a refrigerated container filled with roses and avocados from Kenya to the Netherlands. The company found that almost 30 people and organizations were involved in processing the box on its journey to Europe. The shipment took about 34 days to get from the farm to the retailers, including 10 days waiting for documents to be processed. One of the critical documents went missing, only to be found later amid a pile of paper. How would TradeLens improve this kind of situations?
  • [09:45] What can you tell us about the security challenges of the system? Is there a hacking risk?
  • [11:04] What can you tell us about the road map – the major milestones and timeline – for TradeLens?
  • [14:21] Blockchain is a community effort. If you drive together with one player you will highly unlikely to achieve the desire blockchain. Neutral parties are required. How do they see the alliance moving forward given a number of shipping lines comments that they won’t join because of Maersk?
  • [20:35] How do you encourage and motivate more players maritime transportation and logistics community has to adopt the technology?
  • [24:55] There has been the problem of corruption across countries. Have you faced this challenge so far and how do you go around to solve it?
  • [27:37] From the TradeLens website, is that “the platform is delivered by the IBM Cloud to members around the world.” TradeLens insists, however, that “Blockchain is the core technology that powers TradeLens, ensuring that the data remain secured, permissioned, and distributed.” If TradeLens lives on IBM’s servers, then IBM can alter the blockchain, withhold data, censor transactions, mine information, etc. There have also been public and private concerns about the neutrality of the solution. How would you comment on this?
  • [31:10] What do you hope to achieve in the next 12 months?
  • [34:30] Do you think if you get 80% adoption rate throughout the main players in the industry – this could lead to a global adoption of the technology?
  • [37:20] Would be great to receive the feedback of your audience regarding TradeLens and how we can improve.

Listen to all our past episodes:

#24: Blake Larson MD International Lalamove

 

#24: Blake Larson MD International Lalamove

Blake Larson MD International Lalamove

Today I am happy to have Blake Larson Head and MD International  for LALAMOVE.
Founded in 2013 as EasyVan in Hong Kong, Lalamove is the leading same day delivery platform present in 129 cities in 9 countries across Asia. Through its mobile & desktop platform, Lalamove connects customers with professional van, motorcycle, lorry and truck drivers. Some of their corporate clients include IKEA, Line or Google. Lalamove raised a total of $161 mil in funding over 6 rounds. The latest funding came from a Series C of $100M on Oct 11, 2017 which means the company is now valued at more than 1 billion dollars.

Also short intro about Blake: he has worked across 4 continents in the retail and technology sector

  • Helped lead the growth of Lalamove from 1 city in SEA to 8
  • Raised Series A funding of USD $10m
  • Launched Easy Taxi app  funded by Rocket Internet, in Hong Kong, Singapore, Mumbai and Jakarta.
  • Co Founded and managed Air Crew Club, which was like Groupon for airline employees, and expanded it to 13 cities across 6 continents

Some of the highlights from the podcast:

  • spending eight weeks in Hong Kong standing outside petrol stations handing out flyers to taxi drivers
  • how does Lalamove work and bring value to the customers
  • last-mile logistics centers differ across the region
  • fastest growing country in SE Asia for Lalamove
  • did Lalamove fail in any city?
  • innovation and greener environment by using less vehicles
  • hiring city directors four launching new markets
  • the four values of the company – passion, grit, humility and execution
  • new employees need to build their chairs – the story behind

Episode #24: Blake Larson MD International Lalamove

 

 

 

Show notes:

  • [01:44] How did you spend your first eight weeks for Rocket Internet in Hong Kong standing outside petrol stations handing out flyers to taxi drivers?
  • [03:46] Tell us more about Lalamove, what it is and how exactly it works and adds value to people?
  • [05:05] And what is your role as MD International?
  • [05:35] How different is it operating across different cities and countries?
  • [07:43] How do last-mile logistics centers differ across the countries/regions in which Lalamove operates? I know Hong  Kong has a 55 minutes delivery guarantee.
  • [10:14] How do you pay the drivers? Is there a revenue sharing model?
  • [10:43] Which was the fastest growing country in SE Asia for you and maybe share some of the key lessons in expanding there?
  • [13:30] Do you have strong competition in the region? 
  • [14:16] With the latest round of funding, what are your plans for expansion and where? Do you plan to target more corporate or SME clients?
  • [15:20] Has Lalamove failed in any city?
  • [17:05] What do Singaporeans care about when talking about your service?  
  • [17:50] Does the same-day delivery have the potential to become a standard delivery option for the masses, or will it remain an option just for the limited number of impatient consumers with deep pockets?
  • [21:25] Thoughts on last mile logistics problems? Will it be the biggest challenge for e-commerce growth?
  • [24:54] Do you plan to attract more corporate clients? The likes of IKEA, Line. 
  • [26:13] How do you hire your city directors? And maybe tell us about the process of doing the launch of a new city.
  • [29:00] What are your main challenges when it comes to finding the right talent? How do you keep up with hiring matters as you grow?
  • [30:02] The four values of the company – passion, grit, humility and execution – How do you tell the story of the company culture and build an interesting brand as employer?
  • [32:12] It is interesting to see HUMILITY as one of your values.  How did you decide to focus on this?
  • [33:56] I understand that you make your new employees build their chairs. What is the story behind that?
  • [37:26] What would be some advice to share to somebody graduating?

Listen to all our past episodes:

#23: Dr. Wolfgang Baier CEO of Luxasia

#23: Dr. Wolfgang Baier CEO of Luxasia

Dr. Wolfgang Baier CEO Luxasia

Today I am happy to have with us dr Wolfgang Baier, CEO of Luxasia. Luxasia is one of the largest regional distributor of over 150 international beauty and luxury lifestyle brands such as Clarins, Estee Lauder, Ferragamo, Hermes and Shiseido and they also have joint ventures with the Coty Group, the LVMH Group and Elizabeth Arden. Present in 15 Asia Pacific countries, and hiring more than 2,000 full-time employees, Luxasia aims to define a new omnichannel experience in the beauty industry in Asia.

Dr. Wolfgang Baier has been the Group CEO of Luxasia Pte Ltd. since August 2016. He joined on a mission to transform the company from being the leading Asian beauty distributor into a Lifestyle Omnichannel Leader adding ecommerce and new industry capabilities to the brick-and-mortar foundation.

Prior to this, Dr. Baier was the Group CEO of Singapore Post from 2011 to 2016. He successfully led the transformation of the Singapore Post Group from a traditional postal service into non-mail business such as logistics, retail and e-commerce and accelerated its global expansion. This resulted in a significant increase of the share price.

Before that Dr. Baier worked for more than 10 years with the top consulting firm McKinsey & Company in Europe and Asia. He was a Partner at the Singapore office leading the Transportation and Logistics as well as Operations activities in South East Asia.

Some of the highlights from the podcast:

  • Luxasia omnichannel experience
  • Regional trends in the beauty industry E-COMMERCE
  • The “phygital” (physical+digital) strategy of health and beauty retailers
  • White spaces in the industry
  • Last mile logistics problems
  • You like to call yourself – Chief Transformation Officer – how does this approach impact the business?
  • Singpost and Luxasia  – how have they shaped your own thinking?

Episode #23: Dr. Wolfgang Baier CEO Luxasia

 

 

 

Show notes:

    • [01:32] How many fragrances do you use now and how many did you use before joining?
    • [02:06] When you joined 2 years ago Luxasia was leading in brick and mortar. And you wanted to focus more on ecommerce. How has that focus changed the business so far?
    • [04:47] What does an Luxasia omnichannel experience feel/look like?
    • [07:31] What are some of the regional trends in the beauty industry E-COMMERCE segment and are they different to perhaps Europe or America and particular to ASIA?
    • [10:12] The importance of “phygital” strategy of health and beauty retailers. Do you see such developments changing and basically shifting the development of department stores all over the region?
    • [11:08] Areas where you find there are lots of room for improvement? What are the white spaces in the industry?
    • [13:33] What opportunities does ecommerce in Singapore provide to investors and how would the market shape up?
    • [15:57] The biggest misconception or misplaced assumption that a brand has over the distributor?
    • [17:08] Last mile logistics problems (more islands means big headache)? Will it be the biggest challenge for e-commerce growth?

      Talent

    • [19:31] What are your main challenges when it comes to finding the right talent?
    • [22:07] How do you select your leadership team?

      Personal

    • [23:35] You prefer to call yourself Chief Transformation Officer – why is this and how does it impact the business?
    • [25:06] How do you collaborate and growth the business with the owning family – Mr Patrick Chong and his children ( I understand they have a direct role in the business as well)
    • [26:35] What is one characteristic that you believe every leader should possess?
    • [28:00] What does it take to Change Culture and have buy in for Transformation?
    • [30:33] How have the two journeys in Singpost and Luxasia shaped your own thinking?
    • [32:15] What would be a piece of advice that you would give recent graduates if they wanted to have a successful career in a company like Luxasia?\

Listen to all our past episodes:

#22: Sanne Manders COO of Flexport

#22: Sanne Manders COO of Flexport

Sanne Manders COO of Flexport

This is episode #22 and I am happy to have with us today Sanne Manders, COO of Flexport.

A couple of words on Flexport, which is one of the fastest growing 3PL in the world. In just five years Flexport has distinguished itself as the leading software-powered freight forwarder, helping more than 15,000 companies deliver their goods to customers worldwide.

Sanne joined Flexport in 2014, soon after the company’s start. As COO, he is responsible for operations, procurement, and carrier relations across all modes of transportation. Before Flexport, he was at Boston Consulting Group, the global management consulting firm, leading customer relations in logistics and supply chain practice, working across worldwide assignments. He also sits on the advisory board of PortXL, which is the accelerator of the Port of Rotterdam.

  • How did Flexport achieve a 15k client portfolio in 4 years?
  • How did Flexport raise a total of 300 mil USD in venture capital?
  • How do plan to reach the scale of traditional players in the industry?
  • How do you use NPS (net promoter score) as a KPI for growing the  business?
  • How much does it help an entrepreneur to have a background in consulting?

Episode #22: Sanne Manders COO of Flexport

 

 

 

Show notes:

  • [01:01] What is the main pain point that Flexport is solving and how are you disrupting the freight and logistics industry?
  • [03:45] With digitization becoming a topic in every company and specifically every supply chain company. How long do you think it will take for traditional players to catch up?
  • [08:04] How do plan to reach the scale of traditional players in the industry?
  • [11:28] As Ryan (CEO Flexport) said in TechCrunch article “There are 25 freight forwarders that each do more than $1 billion in revenue a year,” What will be the USP for Flexport once these companies adopt digital technologies?
  • [15:55] Why did you choose the route of giving your software for free and becoming a 3PL? Instead of focusing on becoming a software company?
  • [18:37] What are your biggest challenges when attracting new clients?
  • [23:34] What and how Flexport is able to assure logistics companies/partners that Flexport is always up to date in terms of complexity of custom regulatory compliance especially in APAC?
  • [25:40] In april 2018 Flexport announced that it secured $110M in funding from SF Express, the leading courier company in China – what will you be using the funds for?
  • [28:05] What were some of the lessons you learned so far as an entrepreneur? Key takeaways.
  • [32:50] What do you focus on when hiring people at Flexport? What are some of the key attributes you look for in the leadership team?
  • [41:06] How do you use NPS (net promoter score) as a KPI for growing the  business?
  • [44:40] You have a very interesting career as you worked for many years at BCG as a consultant for the shipping and logistics industry. How did you end up at Flexport?
  • [47:10] How did your consulting background help you in your career so far?
  • [50:35] What would be the top advice you would share with somebody who wants to join a start up?

Listen to all our past episodes:

#21: Bijay Singh Global Head Healthcare Business Unit at DKSH

 Bijay Singh Global Head Healthcare Business Unit at DKSH

Bijay Singh Global Head Healthcare Business Unit at DKSH

This is episode #21 and I am happy to have with us today Bijay Singh.

Bijay Singh joined DKSH as Vice President, Global Business Development for Business Unit Healthcare in July 2015. He was designated Global Head Business Unit Healthcare as of July 2017.

Bijay Singh has twenty-four years of experience in the Healthcare industry. From 2004 to 2015, he held various senior positions at Novartis, a leading global Swiss healthcare company. Prior to 2004, Bijay Singh worked for eleven years in various positions for Eli Lilly in Asia and the United States as well as for two global audit companies. He has lived and worked in four continents and has amassed over 15 years work experience in the healthcare field across Asia.

Education: Bijay Singh holds a Bachelor of Business Administration (Hons) from Simon Fraser University, Personal Data Canada and a Master’s degree in Business Administration from Stanford University, California.

Stay tuned as we cover:

  • The business model of DKSH
  • Interesting case studies when working with key clients
  • Key challenges in Asia compared to Europe or US
  • Healthcare needs in Asia
  • Factors driving growth in healthcare SEA
  • How do the regulatory services work for DKSH?
  • Recruiting – what are the key attributes you are looking for?

Episode #21: Bijay Singh Global Head Healthcare Business Unit at DKSH

 

 

 

Show notes:

  • [01:21] Tell us about the DKSH model and how it is helping healthcare companies expand in Asia?
  • [03:49] Why would a pharma or healthcare company use DKSH instead of opening their own distribution and marketing channel?
  • [06:21] Who would be some of your key clients and maybe if you can share 1-2 of the most successful case studies?
  • [13:47] What are some of the key challenges that your clients face in Asia as compared to Europe or US?
  • [15:25] Are there some main differences between the population healthcare needs and wants in Asia as compared to other parts of the world?
  • [18:46] What are some of the factors driving growth for the industry in the region?
  • [21:04] I know that DKSH’s market expansion service for pharmaceuticals involves regulatory approvals and licensing. Can you tell us more about that as it is an important point given the complexity each country requires.
  • [23:34] What are some of the major value added services you look to expand into?
  • [27:08] What are some of the countries in Asia where you see the most growth?
  • [30:00] In terms of talent and skills required for growing your business, what are some of the hardest skills to find?
  • [32:21] Are there certain hard skills that you are looking for?
  • [35:48] When you are recruiting for your senior leadership team, given the dynamic environment we live in, what are the most important attributes you are looking for?
  • [37:45] How was it for you personally to transition from a healthcare company to DKSH? What were the main learnings?
  • [42:01If you were to share one piece of advice to somebody just graduating and wanting to achieve a successful career, what would it be?

Listen to all our past episodes:

#20: Paul Srivorakul Co-Founder & Group CEO aCommerce

#20: Paul Srivorakul Co-Founder & Group CEO aCommerce

Paul Srivorakul Co-Founder & Group CEO aCommerce

This is episode #20 and I am happy to have with us today Paul Srivorakul.

Paul has a global background, being born in Thailand and raised in California. Although he got a BA in anthropology at University of California Berkeley in 2000, he caught the internet bug early and got a sales job at Ask.com in the U.S. (his brother was working at Apple). They both decided to become entrepreneurs, so they quit their jobs and moved back to Thailand to look for opportunities, and decided to focused on online advertising.

They used credit card debt to fund the startup Newmedia Edge, started in 2006, which went on to be acquired for about $8 million. Even while running Newmedia Edge, they started a second firm, ad network business Admax in 2007, selling it to Indian firm Komli Media in 2012 for $36 million.

Paul started his third venture, Ensogo, in 2010 after seeing the Groupon phenomenon in U.S. and selling it the U.S. social media firm LivingSocial in October 2012 (for an undisclosed sum). Earlier in 2012, he had already launched Advent Capital in Thailand, to seed ecommerce firms around Southeast Asia, which sparked his idea to start aCommerce.

5 years later aCommerce is now the leading ecommerce service provider in Southeast Asia bringing brands and retailers online to reach consumers in the world’s fastest growing markets in SE Asia.. And in the most recent funding round in November 2017 raised more than $65 million. Now boasting 1400 stafff across 5 countries and 9 fulfillment centers.

Stay tuned as we cover:

  • The story of aCommerce
  • Key clients and  projects
  • What’s better? Being an investor or being a  founder?
  • Key point for a regional startup to raise funds
  • Did starting in Thailand make the startup better?
  • What is the exit strategy for aCommerce?
  • How do you hire people to join aCommerce?
  • How do you shape the company’s culture?
  • Leadership principles

Episode #20: Paul Srivorakul Co-Founder & Group CEO aCommerce

 

 

 

Show notes:

  • [02:16] Tell us more about aCommerce and what is the story behind it?
  • [05:35] What are some of the clients you are working with and give us some examples of projects you help them with?
  • [12:15] You founded and exited several regional startups in group-buying, ad-network, digital marketing agency field. Now you are running a VC and a full-solution eCommerce startup so you’re working on both sides of the table. Which role is your favorite and why?
  • [16:31] As a seasoned serial entrepreneur and a VC veteran, what was your fund-raising strategy for aCommerce? What is the key point for a regional startup to raise funds?
  • [19:29] What are the key points each startup should master to successfully go regional in Southeast Asia?
  • [20:59] You are an example of a Thai startups which went regional. Did it helped that you started there or would it have been easier to start somewhere else? 
  • [23:48] What is the exit strategy for aCommerce and what would be the result that makes you most happy? Will you grow it to sell again like your previous startups or build it to last?
  • [28:09] What are the most important tech trends that you invest in? How do you make the distinction from hype to real deal?
  • [32:25] How do you hire people to join aCommerce? What are the top attributes you are looking for?
  • [37:08] As the CEO, you are one of the key drivers of culture in aCommerce. What would be some of the key aspects of culture and how would you consciously shape it?
  • [39:56] Are there certain leadership principles that you follow?
  • [42:52What would be the top advice you would share with somebody who wants to embark on the journey of entrepreneurship?

Listen to all our past episodes:

#19: Matthew Tillman CEO of Haven Inc

#19: Matthew Tillman CEO of Haven Inc.

Matthew Tillman CEO of Haven Inc

This is episode #19 and I am happy to have with us today Matthew Tillman.

Matthew Tillman is the CEO and Founder of Haven. Haven was founded in 2014 to help commodity firms automate logistics, collaborate with partners, and gain value insights into their supply chain. With the goal of the platform is to essentially serve as the “Salesforce for logistics, capturing the end-to-end workflow of shipping cargo.”

Haven supports customers around the world from offices in Singapore, Switzerland and San Francisco. They raised a Series A round of $11 million.

Prior to founding Haven, Matt held Technology and Product leadership roles at several Finance and Advertising companies specializing in Artificial Intelligence. But before that, Tillman was the son and grandson of truckers. He’s the first in three generations not to drive a truck for a living.

Stay tuned as we cover:

  • The story of Haven Inc
  • Differentiating from a traditional broker
  • ‘Healthy’ data
  • How does a big investment change the company’s growth
  • Why Singapore?
  • How do they compete with 3PLs
  • Impact  of Blockchain – real and hype
  • How do you hire and shape the culture

Episode #19: Matthew Tillman CEO of Haven Inc

 

 

 

Show notes:

  • [01:18] Tell us a bit – what is it that you do and  the story of Haven Inc and what are you trying to achieve. 
  • [06:02] How do you differentiate yourself from a traditional broker? I know you are adamant about your brand as a software company.
  • [07:32] Talking about data – how do you get your data? How do you make sure you get ‘healthy’ data?
  • [10:54] How important was the series A investment and how did it impact your growth speed? What were some of your main learning for other start ups listening to us.
  • [15:12] What made you come to ASIA and Singapore in particular?
  • [17:36] Who are the biggest partners and supporter of the company? I know that  you work closely with the Singapore government.
  • [19:13] How did the 3PL industry react to your service?
  • [22:04] Let’s talk consolidation. How do you see the future of the industry? I know  you have some clear thoughts on this.
  • [27:41] What is the most  important mark that you want Haven to leave on the industry?
  • [30:31] How do we get over the ‘black sheep’ in the blockchain room AKA customs?
  • [37:20Apart from price and service, what topics do you see driving 3pl selection in 2019?
  • [39:48How do you hire people to join Haven? What are the top attributes you are looking for?
  • [43:20] What do you shape the culture of the company?
  • [45:14What are the key learning that you got during your entrepreneurship journey?

Listen to all our past episodes:

#18: Ed Clarke Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer Yojee

#18: Ed Clarke Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer Yojee

Ed Clarke Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer Yojee

This is episode #18 and I am happy to have with us today Ed Clarke.

Professional Australian football player, Co-Founder and Managing Director of Yojee, an exciting logistics technology company listed on the Australian Stock Exchange (ASX: YOJ) that has developed a technology platform that builds a solution to redefine the logistics industry and transform it to keep up with the e-commerce boom, utilising the global sharing-economy concept.

Ed has been featured by Executive Series in Australia, Tech in Asia magazine, Prime Mover, Proactive Investors Australia, Post And Parcel magazine and numerous logistics and technology related media. Being consultant, industry spokesmen Ed has been invited as a speaker to international conferences as an industry expert with primary focus on logistics technology, blockchain, Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning.

Ed is an experienced technology entrepreneur with extensive experience in taking innovative technology platforms to market in areas such as real-time communication, big data Marketing and e-commerce. As Vice President of Sales at Temasys, Ed was part of a team that IBM recognized as one of the “Top-5 global start-ups to watch in 2014”.

Ed was Vice President of Sales and Marketing with Silicon Valley and Asia venture capitalist- backed marketing technology platform, Ematic, which now has more than 80 of South East Asia’s leading e-commerce retailers on its technology platform – a feat achieved within its first 12 months on the market.

Stay tuned as we cover:

  • The story of Yojee
  • What are the key clients that you work with?
  • How complicated and costly was the process of raising funding?
  • Is Blockchain going to transform the industry?
  • The inertia between enterprise and technology. How do you see large companies innovating?
  • What are some of the key messages you wish you could tell every logistics CEO?
  • How do you grow your team?

Episode #18: Ed Clarke Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer Yojee

 

 

 

Show notes:

  • [01:02] Tell us a bit – what is it that you do and  the story of Yojee and key achievements. 
  • [05:11] What are the key lessons so far. Financing. Growth. Discipline
  • [08:20] What are the key clients that you work with? 
  • [10:15] Talking about discipline. What are the lessons on listing on the stock exchange? 
  • [16:10] How complicated and costly was the process of raising funding?
  • [19:20] Is Blockchain going to transform the industry?
  • [23:12] Where is logistics and supply chain technology going?
  • [27:59] The inertia between enterprise and technology. How do you see large companies innovating?
  • [34:38] What are some of the key messages you wish you could tell every logistics CEO?
  • [38:02] How do you grow your team?
  • [39:48] Do you consider yourself a disruptor?
  • [41:05] One of the company’s values is:  Don’t go broke! How did you come up with it?

Listen to all our past episodes:

#17: Dr. Yossi Sheffi Director of the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics

 

#17: Dr. Yossi Sheffi Director of the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics

Dr. Yossi Sheffi Director of the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics

This is episode 17 and I am happy to have with us today Dr. Yossi Sheffi.

Dr. Yossi Sheffi, professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he serves as Director of the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics. He is an expert in systems optimization, risk analysis, and supply chain management, which are the subjects he teaches and researches at MIT. He is the author of many scientific publications and five books:

Under his leadership, MIT CTL launched many new educational, research, and industry/government outreach programs, leading to substantial growth. He founded the MITx MicroMasters in Supply Chain Management. He is the founder and the Director of MIT’s Master of Supply Chain Management degree. He also led the international expansion of MIT CTL by launching the Supply Chain and Logistics Excellence (SCALE) global network of academic centers of education and research. The network includes centers modeled after MIT CTL in Zaragoza, Spain;Bogota, Colombia; and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

From 2007 to 2011 he served as the Director of the MIT Engineering Systems Division, where he set a strategy, revamped the PhD program, and set the division for future growth.

Outside the university Professor Sheffi has consulted with governments and leading manufacturing, retail and transportation enterprises all over the world. He is also an active entrepreneur, having founded and co-founded five successful companies:

  • Princeton Transportation Consulting Group Inc.
  • LogiCorp Inc.
  • e-Chemicals Inc.
  • Syncra Inc.
  • Logistics.com Inc.

Stay tuned as we cover:

  • extensive interviews with more than 100 executives on sustainability in business
  • “profits versus planet” or is it instead a more subtle issue of (some) people versus (other) people
  • the example of Walmart and Greenpeace fighting for sustainable seafood
  • younger people are more environmentally aware
  • price premium is related to a brand that symbolizes quality – Forbes has valued the Coca-Cola brand at over $50 billion
  • how is sustainability impacting supply chains?
  • the example of Patagonia – outdoor clothing marketed as sustainable
  • issues which are prevalent in today’s Supply Chain which are being overseen?
  • How to evaluate how much resilience you need in an organisation?
  • How will 3PLs be impacted by huge ecommerce companies?
  • Top 3 attributes that a Chief Supply Chain Officer needs to have?
  • What is your vision for supply chain and logistics education?

The interview is split into 4 parts – so if you want to skip directly to the point  of interest please go ahead:

  • [02:38] Part 1 – Talking first about your latest book – Balancing Green, When to Embrace Sustainability in a Business (and When Not To)
  • [28:11] Part 2: Industry Trends
  • [01:04:55] Part 3: Talent and Recruitment in Supply Chain and Logistics
  • [01:11:48] Part 4: Future of Education

Episode #17: Dr. Yossi Sheffi Director of the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics

 

 

Show notes:

 

Part 1 – Talking first about your latest book – Balancing Green, When to Embrace Sustainability in a Business (and When Not To):

  • [02:38] Drawing on extensive interviews with more than 100 executives, what are the implications of balancing traditional business goals with sustainability? What’s a realistic overview on how executives think about this issues?
  • [04:36] For companies, sustainability is not a simple case of “profits versus planet” but is instead a more subtle issue of (some) people versus (other) people—those looking for jobs and inexpensive goods versus others who seek a pristine environment. The question is, how far one should go with sustainability? And maybe touch upon the three basic business rationales for corporate sustainability efforts: cutting costs, reducing risk, and achieving growth.
  • [08:26] You give the example, of Walmart – worked with various stakeholders to develop seafood certification programs that support sustainability. In 2015, the environmental group Greenpeace contended that Walmart was not doing enough, whereas Alaskan fisherman and state officials complained that the company was asking too much of them. So what’s the best way to go about it?
  • [11:52] Another example that you give, we see that younger people are more environmentally aware than older folks. As they grow in purchasing power, they may buy from companies that are sustainable.What are your views on this?
  • [15:25] But part of the price premium is related to a brand that symbolizes quality, youth, or other desirable attributes. Forbes has valued the Coca-Cola brand at over $50 billion based on the brands contribution to sales. This is why companies with valuable brands are particularly susceptible to NGO pressure campaigns.DO you have any examples in this direction and what are your views?
  • [19:08] How did Unilever become “sustainability” focused? 
  • [21:18] How is sustainability impacting supply chains? Would you argue that sustainability is in fact a supply chain issue?
  • [24:52] Let’s talk a bit the example of Patagonia, the American clothing company that sells outdoor clothing marketed as sustainable.. They sell to people who care about the environment. The company is committed to sustainability throughout the supply chain. Can you tell us a bit more about this study case?

Part 2 – Industry Trends:

  • [28:11] Some of the major customer pinch points are being resolved by the emergence of Omnichannel and BlockchainWhat would be the best way to gear ourselves for the change that is on-going and is to come from a retailer perspective?
  • [34:33] What are the issues which are prevalent in today’s Supply Chain which are being overseen?
  • [38:45] With Supply chain Digitisation becoming a key topic for many organisations, will the Supply Chain function move from the back office (Cost Centre) to Front Office (Revenue Generation)?
  • [41:49] Its been 2 years since the book “The Power of Resilience” was published, how has the type of supply chain risks that threaten large organizations shifted, if any and with development of IoT, AI etc .. are company adopting technology to mitigate identified risk? (or even enable them to identify other risk and mitigate / prevent those risk?) – if yes, what are some examples.
  • [47:10] How to evaluate how much resilience you need in an organisation?
  • [50:30] In your book, “Logistics Clusters”, you have applauded Singapore as one of the successful logistics clusters. What will Singapore’s Smart City drive, with the push for a Smart Nation which is about transforming Singapore through technology. To leading economy powered by digital innovation. How would this add to Singapore’s status as the global leader and a formidable competitor to other logistics clusters?
  • [53:19] What impact will blockchain have on Supply Chain and Transportation?
  • [01:02:01] Global retail companies build their own supply chain logistics network. How strongly will this effect the business model of 3PL logistics provider? (we would also add do you think the ecommerce giants like Alibaba or Amazon will go and offer 3PL services?)

Part 3 – Talent and Recruitment:

  • [01:04:55] In the age of digitization, machine learning, robotics, What skills will be required by future supply chain leaders? What are the top 3 attributes that a Chief Supply Chain officer needs to have?
  • [01:06:51] Considering your academic background it would be interesting to know which are the most relevant skills companies are looking for in fresh graduates and if Asian universities are preparing students. Maybe splitting between China/Singapore and other countries (ASEAN area and India).

Part 4 – Future of Education:

  • [01:11:48] What is your vision for supply chain and logistics education? What are the type of skill sets needed. A challenge exists today in closing the gap of what’s need now and what the education system is producing.
  • [01:12:59] Some examples of teaching students at MIT – how do you give them the best resources to learn?
  • [01:14:34] How do you see MOOC’s developing in future? Will Universities like MIT will go completely digital or will it co-exist with on campus education?

Listen to all our past episodes:

#16: Marco Civardi Managing Director Vietnam, Cambodia, Myanmar & Laos at Damco

#16: Marco Civardi Managing Director Vietnam, Cambodia, Myanmar & Laos at Damco

Marco Civardi Managing Director Vietnam, Cambodia, Myanmar & Laos at Damco

This is episode #16 and I am happy to have with us today Marco Civardi.

Marco Civardi is a seasoned logistics professional with over 21 years of experience working in general management covering sales, trade lane development and key account management.

Marco is currently Area Managing Director for Damco Vietnam, Cambodia, Myanmar and Laos. Marco is a hands-on leader and has built strong and stable businesses in VCML which are key markets for the Damco global business.

Marco’s previous role was Regional Head of the Fashion Vertical for Asia Pacific based in Tokyo for Panalpina.  In this role, Marco led a virtual team of fashion’s sales experts across many countries, including Korea, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, Vietnam, Thailand, India and Australia.  Prior to that, he was the Head of Marketing & Sales for Panalpina Japan.  In addition to Japan, he lived and worked in Italy, Hong Kong and Australia.  

Marco is Italian, and speaks several languages, including Japanese. He received an MBA from the Macquarie Graduate School of Management in Sydney. Additionally, he received a Certificate in Supply Chain Management from the Cranfield School of Management in UK.

Stay tuned as we cover:

  • challenges and opportunities in the emerging markets
  • technology and how important ‘myDamco’ system is
  • continuous improvement case studies
  • finding talent in emerging markets
  • some of the skills that logistics professionals need to have to stay relevant on the long term?
  • main drivers for culture shaping
  • the switch from sales and marketing to a full PnL role

 

The interview is split into 3 parts – so if you want to skip directly to the point  of interest please go ahead:

  • [02:02] Part 1: Industry Trends
  • [18:43] Part 2: Talent and Recruitment in Supply Chain and Logistics
  • [31:30] Part 3: Personal success stories and habits

Episode #16: Marco Civardi Managing Director Vietnam, Cambodia, Myanmar & Laos at Damco

 

 

 

Show notes:

 

Part 1 – Industry Trends:

  • [02:02] Tell us a bit about each market specifically and some key facts about doing business in each country.
  • [04:03] What are some of the challenges and opportunities in the emerging markets you lead? What would you say stands out as unexpected – maybe some stories about pleasant and unpleasant surprises you had when starting.
  • [12:12] Let’s talk about technology. What is “myDamco” (a system that is used to keep track of orders from clients) and how does it improve your operations?
  • [13:28] Any continuous improvement case studies that you want to share?
  • [17:10] You lead one of the most successful clusters in the region. Can you share some of the ‘secrets‘ that made the cluster so efficient? 

Part 2 – Talent and Recruitment:

  • [18:43] Finding talent in emerging markets is different to finding talent in mature markets like Singapore or Europe. What are some of the challenges and opportunities you find?
  • [23:25] New technologies are changing logistics at a faster pace than ever before. What are some of the skills that logistics professionals need to have to stay relevant on the long term?
  • [26:03] Are there some leadership principles that you follow in your day to day work?
  • [28:00] As a leader, you are one of the main drivers for culture. What are some of the key elements that you focus on when it comes to shaping culture?

Part 3 – Personal success stories and habits:

  • [31:30] In your career you made the switch from sales and marketing to a full PnL role for a major important cluster. How did you manage to do that and what were your key learnings?
  • [34:50] If you could give some advice to a 23 year old graduating university and wanting to achieve a great career in logistics, what would it be?

#15: Dr. John Gattorna Executive Chairman for Gattorna Alignment

#15: Dr. John Gattorna Executive Chairman for Gattorna Alignment

Dr. John Gattorna Executive Chairman for Gattorna Alignment

This is episode 15 and I am happy to have with us today dr. John Gattorna. John is the Executive Chairman of Sydney-based specialist advisory business, Gattorna Alignment and he is one of the most respected supply chain thought leaders globally.

He has spent a lifetime working in and around enterprise supply chains, in many different capacities – line executive, researcher, consultant/adviser, teacher, mentor and author. He is passionate about the subject – some might say obsessive.

In the late 1980s, John became disenchanted with the lack of conceptual depth in the ‘logistics’ field; and as it turned out this did not improve much as logistics thinking morphed into ‘supply chains’ in the 1990s. So he started to search for a new model/framework that would better inform the design and operation of enterprise supply chains, seeking to satisfy customers and consumers, at the appropriate cost-to-serve. And he found it in dynamic alignment.

For the last two decades John has been working with major blue chip corporations around the world to take his new model from the conceptual stage to a finer level of granularity; companies such as Dell, Unilever, Teys Australia and Schneider Electric. It has been a complex task , involving learning about, and combining, several disparate disciplines – consumer/customer behavior; internal cultural capability of the enterprise; leadership styles; and of course the operational aspects of corporate logistics networks and supply chains. The unique quality about John’s perspective is that he presents a multi-disciplinary whole-of-business approach to the design and management of enterprise supply chains, and this requires an eclectic mindset.

He has written several books along the way as his thinking has evolved, but his three (3) most recent titles have been seminal: Living Supply Chains (FT Prentice Hall, Harlow, 2006); Dynamic Supply Chain Alignment, (Gower Publishing, Farnham, 2009); and Dynamic Supply Chains: How to design, Build and Manage People-Centric Value Networks, (3rd edn., FT Publishing, Pearson, Harrow, 2015.)
Another book is in the works, due mid-2020.

John also has a strong academic pedigree having taught undergraduate, post-graduate, and executive programmes at the University of New South Wales and Macquarie University in Sydney; Oxford and Cranfield Universities in the UK; and Normandy Business School in Le Havre, France. He currently holds Adjunct Professorships at Cranfield School of Management and Macquarie Graduate School of Management, and is Chairman of the Advisory Board at the Institute of Logistics and Supply Chain Management, Victoria University, Melbourne. He also teaches on the M.Comm programme at Normandy Business School, Le Havre, France.

 

Stay tuned as we cover:

  • The Gattorna Alignment
  • Most successful projects you have been involved in with your clients?
  • 3 things you ask the client to quickly identify the root issue?
  • Most advanced tools we can use in SCM, in order to have visibility of the future
  • What is the future of Supply Chain with Blockchain
  • What’s the essence of the term, “Supply Chain Resilience”
  • Shape the culture to achieve high performance in their supply chain?
  • Top 3 attributes that a Chief Supply Chain Officer needs to have?
  • Leadership principles that you follow in your day to day work?

 

The interview is split into 3 parts – so if you want to skip directly to the point  of interest please go ahead:

  • [02:53] Part 1: Industry Trends
  • [59:55] Part 2: Talent and Recruitment in Supply Chain and Logistics
  • [01:11:01] Part 3: Personal success stories and habits

Episode #15: Dr. John Gattorna Executive Chairman for Gattorna Alignment

 

 

Show notes:

 

Part 1 – Industry Trends:

  • [02:53] Tell us a bit about the Gattorna Alignment – how you came up with the concept and maybe a specific example of how you applied it with great success for one of your clients
  • [07:21] As far I know you were also one of the pioneers who coined the term 4PL. Can you give us the history of how that happened?
  • [10:15] What is one of the most successful projects you have been involved in with your clients? What made it successful and what are some of the principles other companies can use to transform their supply chains? (maybe Unilever or Dell or Schneider Electric)
  • [21:38] When you start working on an assignment, what are the top 3 things you ask the client to quickly identify the root issue?
  • [22:18] You work with big multinationals worldwide, are there some common challenges they face around their supply chains? Any specific differences linked to each continent/country?
  • [25:07] What are the most advanced tools we can use in SCM, in order to have visibility of the future and minimize (or eradicate) risks, while moving forward?
  • [31:25] Organizations can not invest in all the technologies at the same time. How should they prioritize the areas of their investment to counter the volatility?
  • [33:59] What is the future of Supply Chain with Blockchain, if there is one. (Taking into consideration we have a learning curve and an adaptability curve with regard to the varying complexities in a Supply Chain.) And if any trends more specific to South East Asia
  • [39:00] Digitization is shaping and will reshape the landscape where communication, IT is concern, how do you see the physical movement part will change, to cope? Is better inventory, BTO the answer?
  • [41:57] What’s the essence of the term, “Supply Chain Resilience” for a 3rd Party Logistics like us. How does a 3PL become resilient? What do you think the role of 3PLs will be in the future?
  • [47:00] What is your view on the structure of our industry going forwards: the evolution of uber-type organisations in road transport, and digital freight forwarders like Kontainers and Freightos will fundamentally change our industries structure – think of the holiday industry in the last 20 years and the development of online booking.
  • [49:15] Data is key to us all and is our unique IP. As a shipper should we be in-sourcing data and outsourcing transactional processes? If so does that mean the end of Provider driven 4PL are solutions and the development of internal shipper 4PL’s?
  • [52:39] On blockchain, with so many players coming up with its own blockchain, do you see the possibility of a true total connected blockchain network happening?
  • [54:00] What do you thinks is the future supply chain target operating model? Will there be best in class models for different industries or the future target operating model will largely be standardized?
  • [55:35] Many organisations hoping onto adopting these AI related technologies at a rather fast pace and there is already several reports on possible huge talent crunched in coming years, do you think it’s really true and what would be your advice to organizations to ensure the employees are ready for the impact of industrial 4.0?
  • [58:16] What is the common characteristic of resistance that he meets and how does he deal with this enabling people to overcome their disinclination to change?

Part 2 – Talent and Recruitment:

  • [59:55] How can an organisation shape the culture to achieve high performance in their supply chain?
  • [01:03:32] How about leadership – how can an organisation develop, groom and retain top leaders?
  • [01:05:16] What are the top 3 attributes that a Chief Supply Chain Officer needs to have?
  • [01:07:32] In some organisations, Supply chain still doesn’t have a seat at the table with the sales and marketing teams – how can supply chain leaders change this and show to CEOs their value?

Part 3 – Personal success stories and habits:

  • [01:11:01] Are there some leadership principles that you follow in your day to day work?
  • [01:11:23] In your career you made the switch from consulting and working for Accenture to becoming a global figure and recognised thought leader. How did you manage to do that and what were your key learnings?
  • [01:14:52] Any personal habit that contributes to your success?
  • [01:16:28] If you  could give some advice to a 23 year old graduating university and wanting to achieve a great career in supply chain, what would it be?